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Athletic Director - Accountability

Discussion in 'Buckeye Football' started by stagtennis, Dec 3, 2004.

  1. stagtennis

    stagtennis Rose Bowl Bound!!!!

    With the college football coaching carousel in full swing, I wanted to know some BP opinions on the accountability of the athletic director. To me, it seems that the finger is always pointed at the coach. I agree with this in most instances, but when should the administration make the AD take accountability for their programs actions.

    For instance, Notre Dame's AD, Kevin White, watched as the program fell during Bob Davie tenure as coach, George O'Leary's name was dragged through mud after the resume fiasco, Ty W was released after 3 seasons, and today, their #1 guy is pursuing another job. In all likelyhood, Notre Dame will be hiring a coach with less of a resume than Ty. This is terrible. Somebody needs to be held responsible.

    What is everyone else's opinion???
     
  2. ohiobuck94

    ohiobuck94 Buckeye Beach Bum

    Talk to the ND administration. They're the ones who make the final decisions. ND coaches have their hands tied with the academic restrictions that limit the kids they recruit.
     
  3. MegaWoody

    MegaWoody Newbie

    Please cut the crap about the poor ND coaches not being allowed to recruit top kids because "their academic standards are so high". What a joke!

    The average SAT score of ND recruits last year was lower than Oklahoma's.

    This myth is a PR fabrication brought to you by the ND mafia. It's simply not true and never has been.

    You think Knute Rockne could have got into to Princeton?

    Oh yeah, and by the way. You're right Stag. Their athletic director is a fraud too.
     
  4. stagtennis

    stagtennis Rose Bowl Bound!!!!

    I agree Woody...It wasn't the pt of the thread to discuss ND's admission requirement, though some may try to agrue that pt.
     
  5. trinitytex

    trinitytex Newbie

    For the life of me I can't track down a study that was done of all D1 schools and their average football team SATs. But I do remember the gist of it.

    Basically, Stanford, Northwestern, Vandy, Duke and Rice were much higher than everybody else. The Big Ten had great representation in the top 20 (including at least OSU, Purdue and Michigan). And I can't remember where ND fell, but they were behind both OSU and Michigan.

    And OSU was above Michigan.
     
  6. gbearbuck

    gbearbuck Herbie for President

    AD's that rotate coaches and pay the coaches several million in buyout money should be fired (if it happens once that is ok if the situation is warrented... if it is an ongoing issue, it shows me a waste of university money, and a lack to judge or recruit good talent... ie the coach)...
     
  7. biobuck

    biobuck Newbie

    3yards has this in the newslink..for those who missed it, I think this article might be a good one in this thread..

    Geiger, OSU should explain massive debts

    [font=Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif]Published: Friday, December 3, 2004 [/font]
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    '); } } function writeNavigation(showpage,paragraph) { document.write('<table width="100%" border="0" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" bgcolor="E7E7E7" style="border-bottom: 1px solid rgb(153, 153, 153); font-family: Verdana,Arial,Helvetica,sans-serif; font-size: 10px; padding: 4px;"><tr><td>Article Tools:[​IMG][​IMG]</td><td align="right">'); createPrevButton(showpage,paragraph); document.write('Page ' + showpage + ' of ' + paragraph.length); document.write(''); createNextButton(showpage,paragraph); document.write('</td></tr></table>'); } function revealPage(showpage,paragraph) { document.write(paragraph[showpage-1]); } function goPage(direction) { document.location = getThisPage() + getPageJumpDelim(getThisPage()) + 'page='+jump(direction, paragraph); }// function createControlButtons(currentpage,paragraph) {// if (currentpage != 1)// document.write('<INPUT TYPE="button" NAME="prev" VALUE="previous" onClick="goPage(\'previous\');"/>');// if (currentpage != paragraph.length)// document.write('<INPUT TYPE="button" NAME="next" VALUE="next" onClick="goPage(\'next\');"/>');// } function createNextButton(currentpage,paragraph) { if (currentpage != paragraph.length) { document.write('[​IMG]'); } else { document.write('[​IMG]'); } } function createPrevButton(currentpage,paragraph) { if (currentpage != 1) { document.write('[​IMG]'); } else { document.write('[​IMG]'); } } </SCRIPT><SCRIPT language=Javascript> paragraph = new Array():wink2:aragraph[0] = 'The big secret is out. The rumors and whispers can now be said out loud.

    Ohio State and its athletic department have a massive debt problem on their hands.

    According to a Bloomberg news story republished in the Columbus Dispatch Wednesday, OSU\'s "athletic debt" as of June 30 is $202,671,662 - the most of any public institution in the nation. You read that right, $202 million.

    You all wondered why prices went up for football tickets? You wondered why they would enter into that tacky naming deal for the OSU-Michigan game? Here is your answer. It would appear that our athletic department went to the M.C. Hammer School of Finance. I bet the administrators were enticed by the Hammer School\'s catchy alma-mater: It\'s lender time, na, nah, nah, na - lender time. Come on, sing it with me.

    It had always been a common pregame media-mealroom rumor that OSU had run up massive debts in the renovation of Ohio Stadium and in the construction of the Jerome Schottenstein Center. None of us in the media could hammer down any real information because none of us (definitely including myself) had even the foggiest financial or business background to make sense of the documentation, much of which was public. So it isn\'t that anything was being covered up, just that it took a financial journalism specialist from Bloomberg to make sense of it. Then, of course, the Dispatch buries the story in the business section.

    The mention of the Schott reminds me - that massive debt number does not include any debt incurred by the $105 million bond for that building. That debt is now in the books under the Office of Student Affairs (meaning that when the Underground or French Club are broke - you should know what to blame).

    To put this in perspective, the school trailing behind OSU with the most debt is Wisconsin, owing only $90 million. That is less than half, but still a considerable amount.

    Now, I think students and fans at OSU need to have an explanation of what the plan is to pay this debt back.

    Bill Shkutri, OSU\'s senior vice president for business and finance said in the article that they would not permit OSU to default on its loans - which is of course a good thing. But he also said that the school\'s options, should revenues run short, would be to find more donors or cut teams.

    Cutting teams? That would be the ultimate outrage to me and every single participant and fan of non-revenue sports here at OSU. I have criticized OSU a lot here in four years, but Andy Geiger and his staff has reason to be proud of the fact that OSU had in 2002 the third-most varsity sports (37) in the country behind only Harvard and Princeton. That\'s great and so is the fact that not only do we give these athletes great facilities and all the benefits of education, but these teams win too.

    It\'s going to take more than President Holbrook telling them to go do some research to placate the fencers, women\'s ice hockey players, pistol marksmen and women, or men\'s volleyball players that they are going to have to transfer or stop playing because Geiger, Holbrook or Brit Kirwan couldn\'t read a balance sheet.

    Well, it\'s time for accountability from our administrators. How are we going to pay back this money? Students and fans are owed this by the athletic department. Too many people put too much time and money into supporting these teams to not have earned the right to know whether their favorite team might cease to exist or that they might have to pay even more to watch them.

    It would seem logical that Andy Geiger, whose plate I will admit has been more than full recently with Clarett-gate and such, would want to in his final years as director of athletics, seal his legacy as a man who did a great deal for this university and its athletic department and not to have left them both with staggering overruns and a reputation for tattered excess.

    If the athletic department is going to raise football ticket prices, they should agree to freeze prices for students at least. I don\'t have any qualms with them raising prices for non-students, the demand is clearly there for tickets and so they have room to raise prices. That\'s not robbery, that\'s capitalism. But for students it\'s a different story. Students already plug thousands of dollars into the University and should not be as vulnerable to price raises as they are to tuition hikes.

    Also, whoever the new director of athletics is in a few years should pledge not to cut a single sport. Also, they should pledge to continue to not have to dip into the tuition revenues when they have overruns. People who don\'t go to the games, should not have to pay a dime for them. They currently don\'t, and that must continue.

    Please, Andy - you did something very good a few weeks ago when you came out and outlined why all of Maurice Clarett\'s allegations weren\'t true. Now tell us how OSU is going to pay this debt off. You\'ve been straight with students and fans before, please ... do it again. You were straight with me in October 2003, when you called me self-important (and probably right, too) as we fought over the phone - do that again. Be straight with me, be straight with all of us.

    Could you just do it this time in a slightly lower voice?

    Aaron Stollar is a senior in journalism. He can be reached for comment at stollar.8@osu.edu.
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    The big secret is out. The rumors and whispers can now be said out loud.

    Ohio State and its athletic department have a massive debt problem on their hands.

    According to a Bloomberg news story republished in the Columbus Dispatch Wednesday, OSU's "athletic debt" as of June 30 is $202,671,662 - the most of any public institution in the nation. You read that right, $202 million.

    You all wondered why prices went up for football tickets? You wondered why they would enter into that tacky naming deal for the OSU-Michigan game? Here is your answer. It would appear that our athletic department went to the M.C. Hammer School of Finance. I bet the administrators were enticed by the Hammer School's catchy alma-mater: It's lender time, na, nah, nah, na - lender time. Come on, sing it with me.

    It had always been a common pregame media-mealroom rumor that OSU had run up massive debts in the renovation of Ohio Stadium and in the construction of the Jerome Schottenstein Center. None of us in the media could hammer down any real information because none of us (definitely including myself) had even the foggiest financial or business background to make sense of the documentation, much of which was public. So it isn't that anything was being covered up, just that it took a financial journalism specialist from Bloomberg to make sense of it. Then, of course, the Dispatch buries the story in the business section.

    The mention of the Schott reminds me - that massive debt number does not include any debt incurred by the $105 million bond for that building. That debt is now in the books under the Office of Student Affairs (meaning that when the Underground or French Club are broke - you should know what to blame).

    To put this in perspective, the school trailing behind OSU with the most debt is Wisconsin, owing only $90 million. That is less than half, but still a considerable amount.

    Now, I think students and fans at OSU need to have an explanation of what the plan is to pay this debt back.

    Bill Shkutri, OSU's senior vice president for business and finance said in the article that they would not permit OSU to default on its loans - which is of course a good thing. But he also said that the school's options, should revenues run short, would be to find more donors or cut teams.

    Cutting teams? That would be the ultimate outrage to me and every single participant and fan of non-revenue sports here at OSU. I have criticized OSU a lot here in four years, but Andy Geiger and his staff has reason to be proud of the fact that OSU had in 2002 the third-most varsity sports (37) in the country behind only Harvard and Princeton. That's great and so is the fact that not only do we give these athletes great facilities and all the benefits of education, but these teams win too.

    It's going to take more than President Holbrook telling them to go do some research to placate the fencers, women's ice hockey players, pistol marksmen and women, or men's volleyball players that they are going to have to transfer or stop playing because Geiger, Holbrook or Brit Kirwan couldn't read a balance sheet.

    Well, it's time for accountability from our administrators. How are we going to pay back this money? Students and fans are owed this by the athletic department. Too many people put too much time and money into supporting these teams to not have earned the right to know whether their favorite team might cease to exist or that they might have to pay even more to watch them.

    It would seem logical that Andy Geiger, whose plate I will admit has been more than full recently with Clarett-gate and such, would want to in his final years as director of athletics, seal his legacy as a man who did a great deal for this university and its athletic department and not to have left them both with staggering overruns and a reputation for tattered excess.

    If the athletic department is going to raise football ticket prices, they should agree to freeze prices for students at least. I don't have any qualms with them raising prices for non-students, the demand is clearly there for tickets and so they have room to raise prices. That's not robbery, that's capitalism. But for students it's a different story. Students already plug thousands of dollars into the University and should not be as vulnerable to price raises as they are to tuition hikes.

    Also, whoever the new director of athletics is in a few years should pledge not to cut a single sport. Also, they should pledge to continue to not have to dip into the tuition revenues when they have overruns. People who don't go to the games, should not have to pay a dime for them. They currently don't, and that must continue.

    Please, Andy - you did something very good a few weeks ago when you came out and outlined why all of Maurice Clarett's allegations weren't true. Now tell us how OSU is going to pay this debt off. You've been straight with students and fans before, please ... do it again. You were straight with me in October 2003, when you called me self-important (and probably right, too) as we fought over the phone - do that again. Be straight with me, be straight with all of us.

    Could you just do it this time in a slightly lower voice?

    Aaron Stollar is a senior in journalism. He can be reached for comment at stollar.8@osu.edu.
     
  8. Jagdaddy

    Jagdaddy Senior

    Re: the Stollar article:

    I'd guess that NewYorkBuck is the best person to comment, but I do have some professional understanding of debt financing: The short answer is that OSU will pay the debt off w/o problems because the athletic department rakes enough money from selling a sh!tload of football tickets, quite a few hoops tickets (expect a lot more to be sold as the teams improve), media rights $, alumni/booster donations, personal seat licenses . . . to make its debt payments and operate the athletic department. At least I'll assume they do because that stuff gets looked into very closely by bond purchasers, bond rating agencies, bond issuing firms, lawyers . . . before the debt gets issued. Default is always possible, but I'd bet it's damned unlikely unless someone really screwed up badly or tried something cockamamie, which is highly unlikely.

    The kid who wrote the article seems grossly underinformed.
     
  9. Bucklion

    Bucklion Throwback Staff Member Former Premier League Champ

    Have to say that Nebraska's AD has similarly flushed their program down the toilet like ND. "Dirty 5-6" Callahan will never win there, and the idea of bringing in a coach whose last team quit on him just because you want to run a pseudo-gimmick offense to throw the ball more and be more "exciting" is deplorable.


    Looks like White is in huge trouble now too that they've lost out on Meyer if the next guy doesn't have double digit wins in his third year. If he is as bad or worse than Willingham, he will go down as the worst AD in modern history.
     
  10. One aspect at ND and all other high profile college football schools that doesn't get much attention are alumni and people with financial or political influence who have close ties to the University and resident sport programs. Countless graduates go on to financial, political and community success; these people have enormous behind the scenes power and influence upon University boards and officers. Ask Earl Bruce.
     
  11. mildly discussed here
    http://www.buckeyeplanet.com/forum/showthread.php?t=7781

    http://www.thelantern.com/news/2004/12/03/Sports/Geiger.Osu.Should.Explain.Massive.Debts-821156.shtmlGeiger, OSU should explain massive debts

    [font=Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif]Published: Friday, December 3, 2004 [/font]
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    '); } } function writeNavigation(showpage,paragraph) { document.write('<table width="100%" border="0" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" bgcolor="E7E7E7" style="border-bottom: 1px solid rgb(153, 153, 153); font-family: Verdana,Arial,Helvetica,sans-serif; font-size: 10px; padding: 4px;"><tr><td>Article Tools:[​IMG][​IMG]</td><td align="right">'); createPrevButton(showpage,paragraph); document.write('Page ' + showpage + ' of ' + paragraph.length); document.write(''); createNextButton(showpage,paragraph); document.write('</td></tr></table>'); } function revealPage(showpage,paragraph) { document.write(paragraph[showpage-1]); } function goPage(direction) { document.location = getThisPage() + getPageJumpDelim(getThisPage()) + 'page='+jump(direction, paragraph); }// function createControlButtons(currentpage,paragraph) {// if (currentpage != 1)// document.write('<INPUT TYPE="button" NAME="prev" VALUE="previous" onClick="goPage(\'previous\');"/>');// if (currentpage != paragraph.length)// document.write('<INPUT TYPE="button" NAME="next" VALUE="next" onClick="goPage(\'next\');"/>');// } function createNextButton(currentpage,paragraph) { if (currentpage != paragraph.length) { document.write('[​IMG]'); } else { document.write('[​IMG]'); } } function createPrevButton(currentpage,paragraph) { if (currentpage != 1) { document.write('[​IMG]'); } else { document.write('[​IMG]'); } } </SCRIPT><SCRIPT language=Javascript> paragraph = new Array():wink2:aragraph[0] = 'The big secret is out. The rumors and whispers can now be said out loud.

    Ohio State and its athletic department have a massive debt problem on their hands.

    According to a Bloomberg news story republished in the Columbus Dispatch Wednesday, OSU\'s "athletic debt" as of June 30 is $202,671,662 - the most of any public institution in the nation. You read that right, $202 million.

    You all wondered why prices went up for football tickets? You wondered why they would enter into that tacky naming deal for the OSU-Michigan game? Here is your answer. It would appear that our athletic department went to the M.C. Hammer School of Finance. I bet the administrators were enticed by the Hammer School\'s catchy alma-mater: It\'s lender time, na, nah, nah, na - lender time. Come on, sing it with me.

    It had always been a common pregame media-mealroom rumor that OSU had run up massive debts in the renovation of Ohio Stadium and in the construction of the Jerome Schottenstein Center. None of us in the media could hammer down any real information because none of us (definitely including myself) had even the foggiest financial or business background to make sense of the documentation, much of which was public. So it isn\'t that anything was being covered up, just that it took a financial journalism specialist from Bloomberg to make sense of it. Then, of course, the Dispatch buries the story in the business section.

    The mention of the Schott reminds me - that massive debt number does not include any debt incurred by the $105 million bond for that building. That debt is now in the books under the Office of Student Affairs (meaning that when the Underground or French Club are broke - you should know what to blame).

    To put this in perspective, the school trailing behind OSU with the most debt is Wisconsin, owing only $90 million. That is less than half, but still a considerable amount.

    Now, I think students and fans at OSU need to have an explanation of what the plan is to pay this debt back.

    Bill Shkutri, OSU\'s senior vice president for business and finance said in the article that they would not permit OSU to default on its loans - which is of course a good thing. But he also said that the school\'s options, should revenues run short, would be to find more donors or cut teams.

    Cutting teams? That would be the ultimate outrage to me and every single participant and fan of non-revenue sports here at OSU. I have criticized OSU a lot here in four years, but Andy Geiger and his staff has reason to be proud of the fact that OSU had in 2002 the third-most varsity sports (37) in the country behind only Harvard and Princeton. That\'s great and so is the fact that not only do we give these athletes great facilities and all the benefits of education, but these teams win too.

    It\'s going to take more than President Holbrook telling them to go do some research to placate the fencers, women\'s ice hockey players, pistol marksmen and women, or men\'s volleyball players that they are going to have to transfer or stop playing because Geiger, Holbrook or Brit Kirwan couldn\'t read a balance sheet.

    Well, it\'s time for accountability from our administrators. How are we going to pay back this money? Students and fans are owed this by the athletic department. Too many people put too much time and money into supporting these teams to not have earned the right to know whether their favorite team might cease to exist or that they might have to pay even more to watch them.

    It would seem logical that Andy Geiger, whose plate I will admit has been more than full recently with Clarett-gate and such, would want to in his final years as director of athletics, seal his legacy as a man who did a great deal for this university and its athletic department and not to have left them both with staggering overruns and a reputation for tattered excess.

    If the athletic department is going to raise football ticket prices, they should agree to freeze prices for students at least. I don\'t have any qualms with them raising prices for non-students, the demand is clearly there for tickets and so they have room to raise prices. That\'s not robbery, that\'s capitalism. But for students it\'s a different story. Students already plug thousands of dollars into the University and should not be as vulnerable to price raises as they are to tuition hikes.

    Also, whoever the new director of athletics is in a few years should pledge not to cut a single sport. Also, they should pledge to continue to not have to dip into the tuition revenues when they have overruns. People who don\'t go to the games, should not have to pay a dime for them. They currently don\'t, and that must continue.

    Please, Andy - you did something very good a few weeks ago when you came out and outlined why all of Maurice Clarett\'s allegations weren\'t true. Now tell us how OSU is going to pay this debt off. You\'ve been straight with students and fans before, please ... do it again. You were straight with me in October 2003, when you called me self-important (and probably right, too) as we fought over the phone - do that again. Be straight with me, be straight with all of us.

    Could you just do it this time in a slightly lower voice?

    Aaron Stollar is a senior in journalism. He can be reached for comment at stollar.8@osu.edu.
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    The big secret is out. The rumors and whispers can now be said out loud.

    Ohio State and its athletic department have a massive debt problem on their hands.

    According to a Bloomberg news story republished in the Columbus Dispatch Wednesday, OSU's "athletic debt" as of June 30 is $202,671,662 - the most of any public institution in the nation. You read that right, $202 million.

    You all wondered why prices went up for football tickets? You wondered why they would enter into that tacky naming deal for the OSU-Michigan game? Here is your answer. It would appear that our athletic department went to the M.C. Hammer School of Finance. I bet the administrators were enticed by the Hammer School's catchy alma-mater: It's lender time, na, nah, nah, na - lender time. Come on, sing it with me.

    It had always been a common pregame media-mealroom rumor that OSU had run up massive debts in the renovation of Ohio Stadium and in the construction of the Jerome Schottenstein Center. None of us in the media could hammer down any real information because none of us (definitely including myself) had even the foggiest financial or business background to make sense of the documentation, much of which was public. So it isn't that anything was being covered up, just that it took a financial journalism specialist from Bloomberg to make sense of it. Then, of course, the Dispatch buries the story in the business section.

    The mention of the Schott reminds me - that massive debt number does not include any debt incurred by the $105 million bond for that building. That debt is now in the books under the Office of Student Affairs (meaning that when the Underground or French Club are broke - you should know what to blame).

    To put this in perspective, the school trailing behind OSU with the most debt is Wisconsin, owing only $90 million. That is less than half, but still a considerable amount.

    Now, I think students and fans at OSU need to have an explanation of what the plan is to pay this debt back.

    Bill Shkutri, OSU's senior vice president for business and finance said in the article that they would not permit OSU to default on its loans - which is of course a good thing. But he also said that the school's options, should revenues run short, would be to find more donors or cut teams.

    Cutting teams? That would be the ultimate outrage to me and every single participant and fan of non-revenue sports here at OSU. I have criticized OSU a lot here in four years, but Andy Geiger and his staff has reason to be proud of the fact that OSU had in 2002 the third-most varsity sports (37) in the country behind only Harvard and Princeton. That's great and so is the fact that not only do we give these athletes great facilities and all the benefits of education, but these teams win too.

    It's going to take more than President Holbrook telling them to go do some research to placate the fencers, women's ice hockey players, pistol marksmen and women, or men's volleyball players that they are going to have to transfer or stop playing because Geiger, Holbrook or Brit Kirwan couldn't read a balance sheet.

    Well, it's time for accountability from our administrators. How are we going to pay back this money? Students and fans are owed this by the athletic department. Too many people put too much time and money into supporting these teams to not have earned the right to know whether their favorite team might cease to exist or that they might have to pay even more to watch them.

    It would seem logical that Andy Geiger, whose plate I will admit has been more than full recently with Clarett-gate and such, would want to in his final years as director of athletics, seal his legacy as a man who did a great deal for this university and its athletic department and not to have left them both with staggering overruns and a reputation for tattered excess.

    If the athletic department is going to raise football ticket prices, they should agree to freeze prices for students at least. I don't have any qualms with them raising prices for non-students, the demand is clearly there for tickets and so they have room to raise prices. That's not robbery, that's capitalism. But for students it's a different story. Students already plug thousands of dollars into the University and should not be as vulnerable to price raises as they are to tuition hikes.

    Also, whoever the new director of athletics is in a few years should pledge not to cut a single sport. Also, they should pledge to continue to not have to dip into the tuition revenues when they have overruns. People who don't go to the games, should not have to pay a dime for them. They currently don't, and that must continue.

    Please, Andy - you did something very good a few weeks ago when you came out and outlined why all of Maurice Clarett's allegations weren't true. Now tell us how OSU is going to pay this debt off. You've been straight with students and fans before, please ... do it again. You were straight with me in October 2003, when you called me self-important (and probably right, too) as we fought over the phone - do that again. Be straight with me, be straight with all of us.

    Could you just do it this time in a slightly lower voice?

    Aaron Stollar is a senior in journalism. He can be reached for comment at stollar.8@osu.edu.
     
  12. IrontonBuck

    IrontonBuck Walk On

    That's what it takes to have the best athletic facilities in the nation. So, Ohio State is out in front, and the rest will follow. The debt is backed up with the ability to repay it. Ohio State has corporate sponsors, season ticket buyers, with the premiums they pay to gain the right to buy tickets, advertisers, buyers of licensed products, bowl proceeds, and TV contracts. And that's for both football and basketball. The total amount they bring in covers the cost of running the athletic department including all of the non-revenue sports, and also retires the debt in a timely fashion. Even Ohio State has to have good credit to borrow money. They wouldn't have gotten themselves into the debt if they couldn't cover it. This is another non-story, and another attempt to make Ohio State look bad.

    The truth is, the new facilities will last Ohio State for many, many years to come, and have been a great investment. Other schools will have to pay up sooner or later. Major college sports facilities are not free.
     
  13. MililaniBuckeye

    MililaniBuckeye The satanic soulless freight train that is Ohio St Staff Member Tech Admin

    No offense to any of you college students, but when a "senior in journalism" criticizes someone, I nearly always blow them off, because they have little to no real world experience from which to make sound evaluations.
     
  14. OH10

    OH10 *

    yeah, no one cares what the students at Ohio State have to say. It's about the alumni. Afterall, we are the ones that donate the money to the players.... err, the university.


    All sarcasm aside, i absolutely care what the college students have to say. They are the ones that go there now and carry the torch. Real world experience tends to make people more selfish and condescending, not more aware. Kudos to this Lantern writer (i used to be one myself) for calling Andy Geiger out. He's been screwing the students since he got there. He screwed me on full football season tickets my freshman year, made the price at the Scarlet Course unreasonable, and forced students to only buy split packages to basketball games in the upperdeck. The alumni have no idea what's going on there, and the students do. Why don't you listen to the students for a change?
     
  15. Steve19

    Steve19 Watching. Always watching. Staff Member

    Well, let's be objective. It sounds like a huge debt, but what's the sales line look like for the Atheletic Department? 200 big ones with a sales line of $250M and gross profit of $100M is not a problem. 25 big ones with a sales line of $50M and a gross profit of $2M is.

    The stadium was becoming a real hazard, lots of facilities have been built that will outlast us all. OSU has one of the world's top finance faculties. I must admit that I am not very concerned. Now, if they start saying they are having trouble paying off the debt, that's another thing.

    As for the very unprofitable sports, stopping funding them doesn't mean they stop playing. It means they have to find ways to get people to come to their games and support them. The University can help them find ways to do that and still keep them playing.
     

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