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Sending troops to Iraq a mistake.

Discussion in 'Open Discussion (Work-safe)' started by ohiobuck94, Jun 24, 2004.

  1. ohiobuck94

    ohiobuck94 Buckeye Beach Bum

    Poll: Sending troops to Iraq a mistake
    By Susan Page, USA TODAY
    WASHINGTON — Most Americans now say that sending U.S. troops to Iraq was a mistake, a USA TODAY/CNN/Gallup Poll finds. For the first time, a majority also says that the war there has made the nation less safe from terrorism.
    The survey taken Monday through Wednesday shows a turnaround in views toward the war in less than a month. Continued violence in Iraq and questions about the war's justification apparently are eroding support even as the U.S. moves to turn over sovereignty to an interim Iraqi government next week. (Related: Complete poll results)

    It is the first time since Vietnam that a majority of Americans has called a major deployment of U.S. forces a mistake. When the war in Iraq began last year, the public by three-to-one said sending troops wasn't a mistake. Just three weeks ago, 58% still held that view.

    Now, 54% say it was a mistake.

    Souring attitudes toward the war could present challenges to President Bush, who plans to keep thousands of U.S. troops in Iraq even after the handover of power. While he has linked the war to the fight against terror, 55% of those polled now say that the war has increased U.S. vulnerability to terrorism.

    In December, 56% had said the war made the U.S. safer.

    Even so, Bush is doing better against Democrat John Kerry, perhaps because of brightening views of the economy. Among likely voters, Bush leads Kerry 48% to 47%, with independent candidate Ralph Nader at 3%. Three weeks ago, Kerry led 49% to 43%.

    The survey of 1,005 Americans has a margin of error of +/-3 percentage points. The margin of error for likely voters is +/-4 points.

    "The American people are losing confidence" in the war, former Secretary of State Madeleine Albright said in a conference call arranged by the Kerry campaign. She said Bush has a "credibility issue" over the failure to find weapons of mass destruction or ties between the Sept. 11 attackers and Saddam Hussein.

    Last week, the independent commission investigating the attacks reported it found "no credible evidence" of a link. Still, 44% of those surveyed say they think Saddam was personally involved in 9/11.

    Matthew Dowd, chief strategist for the Bush campaign, says changing attitudes toward the war reflect coverage of "terrorists doing terrible things to people, like cutting their heads off."

    But he adds, "The fact that people feel that way doesn't make them feel better about Kerry or worse about us."

    Actually, there seems to be little room for persuasion by either side in a stunningly polarized electorate. Nearly nine in 10 voters (87% ) say there is "no chance whatsoever" that they will change their mind and switch to the other candidate.
     
  2. MightbeaBuck

    MightbeaBuck with hat in hand

    Shouldn’t this be under political?
    Most Americans now say that sending U.S. troops to Iraq was a mistake, a USA TODAY/CNN/Gallup Poll finds.
    The same Gallup polling service that recently found that most Americans believe, at least somewhat, in astrology.

    When the war in Iraq began last year, the public by three-to-one said sending troops wasn't a mistake. Now, 54% say it was a mistake.
    So 29% of those polled are essentially saying they were wrong before. In a year will 29% of these say they are wrong now?

    While Bush has linked the war to the fight against terror, 55% of those polled now say that the war has increased U.S. vulnerability to terrorism. Let’s do the math here. As Jlb1705 says: you doubt me?! Well let's compute it, and I will solve the answer... TO YOUR FACE!!!!! Before we attack Iraq, how many buildings had Middle Eastern terrorists destroyed? I admit they didn’t destroy the Pentagon, but they nailed several buildings, basically a whole block in downtown New York. Since the attack: zero.

    Madeleine Albright said Bush has a "credibility issue" over the failure to find weapons of mass destruction or ties between the Sept. 11 attackers and Saddam Hussein. I had been led to believe that this was a war on terrorism, and while ties, or WMDs woulda been icing on the cake, things are going as well as they can in a war.

    Still, 44% of those surveyed say they think Saddam was personally involved in 9/11.
    Another poll number, which is about twice the number of those surveyed recently that either had been abducted, or knew someone that had been abducted by aliens.

    I love polls, they are so…?
     
  3. ohiobuck94

    ohiobuck94 Buckeye Beach Bum

    mightbeabuck:
    How's things in BG. I graduated from BGSU in 93. :)
     
  4. ashlandbuck

    ashlandbuck Banned

    Look at the pollsters and then read Buckeyegrad's post about media bias.
    Throw this poll and just about anything else that the USA today is involved in away.
     
  5. Buckeyehead

    Buckeyehead Banned

    That's just stupid.
     
  6. gregorylee

    gregorylee I'd rather be napping!!

    Sounds like Susan Page needs to move to Spain where her vote can be influenced by terrorism.
     

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