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What Do Teachers Make

Discussion in 'Open Discussion (Work-safe)' started by buckiprof, Dec 13, 2005.

  1. AKAK

    AKAK Mayor of Turkey Balls Falls Staff Member Bookie

    Doesn't much matter.... you can't have one without the other... You need teachers to teach kids to be CEO so they can make moeny and be taxed and pay the teachers... and round and round she goes. (There are plenty of 'apprentice' type systems... I think teaching in itself is a pretty good example... problem with too much specific job training-- to the deteriment of a general education isn't going to serve the dynamics of the economy.)
     
  2. strohs

    strohs Go Bucks!

    Ive always taken this quote to mean something slightly different.
    Ill use a golf instructor for example.
    They are good, but not good enough to play for money, so they teach.
    It can also be used for some college professors.
    But I dont see how it has any relevance on grade school and high school teachers.
    Most of them do it because they love it, not because they couldn't have excelled at something else.
     
  3. stxbuck

    stxbuck Woody wore Sambas

    I enjoy teaching history and government-I like being around the kids, and I enjoy getting to spout off on things that interest me every day. I teach at a well off parochial school, so I am not one of those "if I can save one kid, it's worth it to be a teacher" types. Also, let's face it-the vacation time in GREAT. I would hate to have a job where I worked 50 or 60 hours a week, and got 3 weeks vacation per year. I teach HS-mostly seniors, there is absolutely no way I would consider teaching jr. high or elementary school.
     
  4. Golferdow01

    Golferdow01 East-Coast Living

    I used to have that mentality till I realized how brilliant college professors are. I have yet to see one who wouldn't have the intelligence to work in the industry. Now we both know a few would couldn't due to the arrogance factor.

    Also, my mother could have become an opera singer or pianist for a symphony, but she chose to teach instead. Had nothing to do with her not being good enough for the real world.
     
  5. DEBuckeye

    DEBuckeye It ain't easy, bein' cheesy.

    Exactly. Plus, although a bit different from our K-12 discussions, in an apprentice system, what does a mentor do, essentially? He teaches.
     
  6. NJ-Buckeye

    NJ-Buckeye They Hate Us cuz They Ain't Us.. Banners are good Staff Member

    I'll re-phrase it.. school buildings were too hot to hold classes.. and there was no means to cool it down... winter cold was not a problem because you had wood...

    if it was agricultural, wouldn't school be broken up around spring and fall breaks.. so the children could help plant and harvest...
    corn plants April/May .. wheat plants Sept/Oct .. not sure about potatoes.. think they have to come out before a freeze... so Oct/Nov? sure there are some differences for all these based on state...

    sorry Thump... http://www.teachervision.fen.com/page/2865.html

    History of the School Year

    <!-- 7: Text goes here --> <!-- Photo placement table --><!-- /Photo placement table --> Why does the American school year start in September and end in June? It's something of a mystery. Did children once "bring in the harvest" on the family farm all summer in the distant rural past?
    Historians at Old Sturbridge Village, a living history museum that recreates an 1830's New England farming village, say not. According to the web site and schoolmistress there, farm children went to school from December to March and from mid-May to August. Adults and children alike helped with planting and harvesting in the spring and fall.
     
    Last edited: Dec 14, 2005
  7. gbearbuck

    gbearbuck Herbie for President

    Three pages and this hasn't been threadjacked yet... that's got to be a new record for the general board...:tongue2:

    Most of the teachers I know, choose to teach because they liked the benefits and the "summer vacation." Job security was important (although you don't have it when you start out), helping to 'build' a kid was also important (although when talking to teachers, suggesting they do something else if they are that upset with their current situation (tend to be ticked about somthing... a kid, an admin., a levy, size of class, etc.), they tend to mention the benefits and summer off before anything else (as reasons to stay)... granted that's from a small sample size... (and the "sample" is all younger teachers)....
     

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